What happened to this blog? It seemed promising, but you never updated it. :(

Anonymous

I’ve actually got a whole bunch of posts planned out, but as it happens, life (and poverty!) really weigh on one’s creative energy for side projects like this blog! I do promise to get back to it eventually, but right now, I’m not exactly in a stable situation yet. I still very much intend to continue work on this!

Thanks much for sending this poke and letting me know that somebody out there is still interested!

ON THE IMPORTANCE OF EGGS. (Includes recipes!) (There’s a note for Vegans and others who don’t eat eggs at the very bottom of the post after the read-more.)
This is the part where I tell you that eating a lot of eggs is actually really good for you, and the part where you freak out and say “but eggs have cholesterol in them and if you eat more then two eggs a week, you’re going to die!” Then I will tell you that this is an antiquated notion that came from before people were aware that the human body made its own cholesterol. (Here is one link regarding this)Now that that’s out of the way. Let’s talk about why eggs are so great. In most places, you can get a carton of 12 eggs for pretty cheap. Or a carton of 18. Or a carton of 24 if you’re really excessive and probably live in an agricultural state. Let’s average out prices and assume that you can get one dozen eggs for about $2. That means that each egg has a cost of about $0.16, which means that for a full serving of protein, which would be 2 or 3 eggs? You’d only be paying $0.32 or $0.50 per serving. Probably cheaper if egg prices in your area are anything like the egg prices in my area: $1.59 or less for a dozen large eggs.So, looking at this, and pairing the fact that your average large egg usually yields 6 grams of protein, it’s possible then, for about 50 cents, for you to get 18 grams of protein. That? Is not a bad deal. That’ll keep you running for a while.
Also, I’m not going to say “eggs never go bad” because that’d not be strictly true. However… It’s pretty close. As long as you keep them refrigerated? Eggs will pretty much keep for… I don’t actually know. I’ve never had an egg that went bad. Ever. It’s protein in nature’s aluminum can. Just use your judgement on this—if you open an egg up and it’s all nasty? Then you should consider not using that egg.Beyond eggs being cheap, protein rich, and long lasting they’re incredibly useful in a wide variety of situations. Eggs can be used for a truly prodigious number of things. So, below, I’m going to list several different fairly cheap recipes/example preparations for eggs.…and before I do that, I realize that for those of you who’ve never handled an egg, I’d recommend going to youtube and searching “how to crack an egg” and watching not just one, but several videos. (I personally like tapping an egg on the side of a bowl gently and repeatedly until there are a series of small cracks, into which I insert my thumb and forefinger  to separate the two halves.)
I’d also mention that raw eggs are covered in bacteria that can cause salmonella, so… Whenever you finish dealing with raw egg, be it handling the shell of one, etc? Make sure to wash your hands with something anti-bacterial and to do the same to any areas that came into contact with raw egg. There are people who say that overusing anti-bacterial things will result in anti-bacterial resistant strains of bacteria. They’re actually somewhat right. However, that’s a large scale problem that you as a single individual have no bearing on. And being poor? You need to do your best to not get sick.

Now? Those recipes I promised after the break. Either take them as I present them, or take a look at them and use the ideas from them for your own things. [[MORE]]____________________________________________________1. Scrambled Eggs.You’ve probably heard of scrambled eggs before. You probably know how to make them. I’m going to tell you how to make them anyway just in case you don’t though, because nobody gets the description right. INGREDIENTS: 2-3 eggs. Optional: shredded cheese, diced vegetables. METHOD: Crack your eggs into a bowl. Take a whisk or a fork and proceed to break up the yolks. Then stir the mixture until you can get it more or less looking the same throughout—a fluffy yellow. There will be a few globs here or there, but that’s unavoidable. Just mix it as best as you can. (Also know that this bowl of mixed up eggs? Is useable in a whole lot of other recipes.) Now, if you’re interested, you can mix in a tablespoon full or two of milk or cream to your egg mix to make the resulting scrambled eggs fluffier. I don’t—it uses milk, which I don’t usually have on hand because it doesn’t keep long and I usually don’t use it fast enough, but if you like keeping milk on hand and are looking for ways to use it? Go for it.Cooking your scrambled eggs:You’re going to want to take a pan and place it on the stove. Medium-to-high heat is your best bet. Just know that eggs can get burned, so if you do it on high heat? You might get some angry tasting eggs the first few times if you’re inexperienced. Once you’ve got a pan on the heat, just pour your bowl of eggs in. Fairly quickly, a layer of cooked eggs is going to form at the bottom of the pan. Because you’re trying to speed up the cooking process and get all the gooey-bits and turn them into non-gooey bits, you’re going to want to use that utensil to scrape the bottom of the pan to get the cooked stuff up. You’re going to mix around your eggs and repeat the scraping and mixing until you can turn all the wet gooey into light, yellow, and fluffy. In this process, you can mix in some shredded cheese or some diced veggies (I recommend diced green peppers and diced tomatoes myself) to add some flavor or some good-for-you-and-tasty-too vegetables. Then keep them in the pan until the cheese is melted or the veggies look to be the right warmth/softness for you.Take out, and serve on a plate or a bowl. I usually add some salt and pepper to mine. A lot of people also like hot sauce with their scrambled eggs, be it taco sauce, tabasco sauce, or sriracha. I even know a few people who like it with ketchup. They’re good for breakfast lunch and dinner, and can usually be accompanied by a bunch of other things to make them a full meal. I personally would recommend some toast, some scrambled eggs, and a nice hot cup of tea for breakfast.___________________________________________________2. Breakfast Burritos. 
This one is pretty simple, but can add just a little bit more to your breakfast. So. You take some of the finished scrambled eggs I mentioned from the above recipe, and roll it up in a tortilla, probably with some taco sauce, and maybe with some pinto beans, black beans, if you can somehow get it cheap or feel like splurging? Some sausage goes well with this. This is also another one of those places where shredded cheese will taste magical with those eggs. Storing one of these in a plastic bag and microwaving it later is a great way to have a quick, warm, filling breakfast, snack, whatever.
____________________________________________________
3. Hard-Boiled Eggs.Basically, you take a pot of water, bring it to a boil, and gently lower some eggs still in their shells into the water. There’s a lot of different opinions on how to go about making them, how long to cook them, etc, so I recommend googling “how to hard-boil eggs” etc. I don’t regularly do hardboiled eggs, so I can’t offer much in the way of advice about making them.What I can tell you is that once you boil them, you can stick them back in the fridge and they become a ready to eat item that will last quite some time. They won’t last as long as raw eggs will, because, well, you cook raw eggs before you eat them. Once you’ve hardboiled eggs, you usually don’t cook them again. But as long as you’re not being unreasonable, you shouldn’t have much of a problem. Oh, and the shells of hard-boiled eggs, being boiled, become safe to touch without worrying about bacteria. They also go pretty well on cold sandwhiches. There’s a classic English sandwhich that has a thin spread of mayonnaise, a sliced hard-boiled egg or two, and some thin slices of cucumber. I dislike cucumber, so I don’t like it, but it’s highly regarded. Personally, I recommend eating hard boiled eggs cold, with a fork, a little bit of salt and enough pepper to make someone cry. (Hard boiled eggs and pepper go rather well together in my opinion.) This said, I will forewarn you, hard boiled eggs can be kind of weird and maybe even a little gross tasting if you’re not used to eating them like this. For some people (like me—I used to hate these things) they can take a little time to get used to, but once you do? They’re a quick and easy ready-to-eat food that you can keep around for a while.There are plenty of other great things you can do with hard-boiled eggs too. Google ‘em.___________________________________________________
4. “Spicy Vegetable Ramen Egg Drop Soup”
So, at some point or another, I will or will have posted a post on Ramen Noodles and also on soup in general. Eggs? Are a great way to add extra protein that you might not otherwise be getting in  a bowl of ramen. Ingredients: 1-3 eggs. 1-2 Packages of instant ramen. Mixed vegetables—frozen or canned. (I recommend carrots, peas, and corn). Soy Sauce is optional. Sriracha Sauce is optional. Some other sort of ‘Asian’ sauce, like “spicy miso sauce” or “stir fry sauce” is optional.Cooking: You put a pot of water over high heat. The amount of water in the pot can vary, but basically it should be enough to cover both bricks of ramen noodles if you try to submerge them. Mix in the ramen flavor packets, toss in an amount of mixed vegetables that you’re comfortable with. Next, you mix up a bowl of scrambled eggs without cooking them. (No milk, though.) Just combine them in a bowl. Add a little bit of soy sauce to it and mix it in with the eggs. You’ll want to take this mix of eggs and slowly pour it into your ramen broth, slowly stirring the broth as you do.At this point, I’d add some soy sauce, sriracha sauce, or some other “Asian” sauce to the broth, mix it in. Taste the broth. Keep doing this until you like how the broth tastes. I personally like it spicy and just use soy and sriracha. Storage: This, as you’ve likely guessed, is going to make a lot of servings. It also keeps and reheats fairly well. You could either portion out bowls of it into tupperware, or, if you have the space in your fridge, put the entire pot in, ladling out servings from it to be reheated as needed. In my opinion, it’s not bad cold, either, but I also enjoy most soups cold anyway. ____________________________________________________5. Fisherman’s Eggs
Now that we’re done giggling at the name of the dish, I’ll give you a small overview of what it is. Simply put, you take a bowl. You put empty a serving of canned sardines into the bottom of the bowl. You fry up an egg (sunny-side-up or over-easy). You place the egg on top of the sardines. You sprinke the whole thing with salt, pepper, and capers. Then you kinda’ smash it together with your fork a little and eat it. Also goes well with a bit of hot-sauce. Preferrably in this case, something like Tobasco. ___________________________________________________Everything Else:There are still lots of ways to cook up eggs that I haven’t mentioned. (I also mentioned over-easy and sunny-side up in the Fisherman’s Eggs recipe.) This post however, is already huge, so I’m going to give you a list of things to google how to do. Eggs: Sunny Side Up.Eggs. Over Easy.Omelet
Baking just about anything. (I’m probably going to cover a lot of baking in the future.)
French Toast (I’ll actually probably do a post on this later)
___________________________________________________
Note for those philosophically opposed to consuming eggs. I certainly understand the philosophical opposition. I used to be in a similar place myself. I realized, however, when I was poor and had few options, that my decision to not eat eggs, meat, etc, were unfortunately purely symbolic. If I choose to not consume/purchase eggs, either someone else will, or a store is going to throw out their unused stock. The various farms, factory or humane, will keep having their chickens lay eggs whether I consume them or not. Similarly, by purchasing eggs, something that millions of people already buy, and something that is used in the commercial food industry, I’m not going to be dramatically supporting the industry. It’d be a drop in the bucket that’d be keeping me alive and fed long enough to get myself into a situation where perhaps I wasn’t so poor as to be unable to afford healthy food that I didn’t object to and would have the power to perhaps educate others to do the same. And for those who would argue that eating eggs itself is murder? Chickens lay eggs whether they are fertilized or not. The eggs we consume? Are unfertilized. They will never grow into a full life form, and were they laid in nature, they’d either rot away, or be consumed by a predator.a

Alright. That’s it everybody. We hope today’s post on eggs was helpful, and we wish you all the very best luck, health, and happiness. <3

ON THE IMPORTANCE OF EGGS. (Includes recipes!)

(There’s a note for Vegans and others who don’t eat eggs at the very bottom of the post after the read-more.)


This is the part where I tell you that eating a lot of eggs is actually really good for you, and the part where you freak out and say “but eggs have cholesterol in them and if you eat more then two eggs a week, you’re going to die!” Then I will tell you that this is an antiquated notion that came from before people were aware that the human body made its own cholesterol. (Here is one link regarding this)

Now that that’s out of the way. Let’s talk about why eggs are so great. In most places, you can get a carton of 12 eggs for pretty cheap. Or a carton of 18. Or a carton of 24 if you’re really excessive and probably live in an agricultural state. Let’s average out prices and assume that you can get one dozen eggs for about $2. That means that each egg has a cost of about $0.16, which means that for a full serving of protein, which would be 2 or 3 eggs? You’d only be paying $0.32 or $0.50 per serving. Probably cheaper if egg prices in your area are anything like the egg prices in my area: $1.59 or less for a dozen large eggs.

So, looking at this, and pairing the fact that your average large egg usually yields 6 grams of protein, it’s possible then, for about 50 cents, for you to get 18 grams of protein. That? Is not a bad deal. That’ll keep you running for a while.

Also, I’m not going to say eggs never go bad” because that’d not be strictly true. However… It’s pretty close. As long as you keep them refrigerated? Eggs will pretty much keep for… I don’t actually know. I’ve never had an egg that went bad. Ever. It’s protein in nature’s aluminum can. Just use your judgement on this—if you open an egg up and it’s all nasty? Then you should consider not using that egg.

Beyond eggs being cheap, protein rich, and long lasting they’re incredibly useful in a wide variety of situations. Eggs can be used for a truly prodigious number of things. So, below, I’m going to list several different fairly cheap recipes/example preparations for eggs.

…and before I do that, I realize that for those of you who’ve never handled an egg, I’d recommend going to youtube and searching “how to crack an egg” and watching not just one, but several videos. (I personally like tapping an egg on the side of a bowl gently and repeatedly until there are a series of small cracks, into which I insert my thumb and forefinger  to separate the two halves.)

I’d also mention that raw eggs are covered in bacteria that can cause salmonella, so… Whenever you finish dealing with raw egg, be it handling the shell of one, etc? Make sure to wash your hands with something anti-bacterial and to do the same to any areas that came into contact with raw egg. There are people who say that overusing anti-bacterial things will result in anti-bacterial resistant strains of bacteria. They’re actually somewhat right. However, that’s a large scale problem that you as a single individual have no bearing on. And being poor? You need to do your best to not get sick.

Now? Those recipes I promised after the break. Either take them as I present them, or take a look at them and use the ideas from them for your own things.

Read More

ON THE IMPORTANCE OF BREAD:Bread is one of those foods that can feed you for quite some time, even if that’s all you have. This said, that’s not the best way to eat bread. The best way to eat bread is as a supplement to a smaller meal, like soup, a salad, etc etc. Bread is a thing that fills you up when the other things you have don’t quite cut it. It can also make for a decent snack. Incidentally, bread, if you know where to look, is incredibly incredibly cheap.  Most stores these days, Walmart included, have a bakery where they sell fresh bread, be they loaves, rolls, what have you. These prices? Are usually pretty awesome. I’ve seen big loaves of whole-wheat bread sell for as low as $0.99. That’s something that could, if you’re doing it right, add to 6-7 meals, or, $0.14 a serving. Now, this is of course, not going to be an always thing, as what the bakery makes and how much it’ll cost you will depend on the materials they have on hand, the season, etc.
Luckily, there’s a way to get this bread for the absolute lowest price—and that’s to get it old. Most of these grocers, (and this includes walmart) have DISCOUNT BAKERY RACKS for them to try to just move off the shelves some of their bakery bread before they have moldy bread sitting around. The prices here, especially for big bags of rolls? Are -awesome-. Now, it’s important that you be aware that because these aren’t bags of high-preservative bread, they -will- get moldy after a period of time. If it’s fresh, depending on where you live, it could last up to something like a week and a half. Old bread could vary, but you usually have 3-4 days at -least-. A way to lengthen the time before the bread goes off is to remove it from whatever bag it’s in and just leave it sitting exposed to the air. It may dry out a little, and it’s apt to get a little stale at the end of its shelf life. There are things you can do with stale bread, but moldy bread is only useful as compost.BUT WHAT IF I DON’T EAT ALL MY BREAD?Well, there’s a solution to this! And that’s that you can freeze bread, dramatically extending its shelf life. This dramatically extends the shelf life of any bread you have. You can keep bread frozen for quite a long time. Sticking it in a freezer/ziplock bag works best. When you expect you’ll be eating a piece (rolls freeze best, usually, fyi) just pull it out of the freezer, dust off any ice that may have formed on it (you want to keep it dry as best as you can while it thaws so it doesn’t get icky) and just leave it to sit on a paper-towel to thaw. You could also potentially microwave or toast your bread (ala frozen waffles,) if you’re impatient. The texture may come out a bit off, but we’re not looking for gourmet bread here. We’re looking for cheap living.Bread can also be kept in the fridge, but people will argue that you should never do that because it ruins the texture. Again. Not gourmet here. Cheap living. This said, refrigeration will only do so much to stave off buggies. Ultimately, it’s up to you. Because bread, especially discount bread is so cheap, feel free to experiment. Keep notes about how long the bread you buy lasts before it gets moldy.And there you go! With prices as low as $0.14 a serving, bakery bread is a great way to supplement a meal so that it fills you up. The uses of bread are pretty obvious, but we’ll post some clever-er things you can do with it in the future!Best of luck to you all. For more money-saving tips, check us out at thesuburbanpoor.tumblr.com!

ON THE IMPORTANCE OF BREAD:

Bread is one of those foods that can feed you for quite some time, even if that’s all you have. This said, that’s not the best way to eat bread. The best way to eat bread is as a supplement to a smaller meal, like soup, a salad, etc etc. Bread is a thing that fills you up when the other things you have don’t quite cut it. It can also make for a decent snack.

Incidentally, bread, if you know where to look, is incredibly incredibly cheap.  Most stores these days, Walmart included, have a bakery where they sell fresh bread, be they loaves, rolls, what have you. These prices? Are usually pretty awesome. I’ve seen big loaves of whole-wheat bread sell for as low as $0.99. That’s something that could, if you’re doing it right, add to 6-7 meals, or, $0.14 a serving. Now, this is of course, not going to be an always thing, as what the bakery makes and how much it’ll cost you will depend on the materials they have on hand, the season, etc.

Luckily, there’s a way to get this bread for the absolute lowest price—and that’s to get it old. Most of these grocers, (and this includes walmart) have DISCOUNT BAKERY RACKS for them to try to just move off the shelves some of their bakery bread before they have moldy bread sitting around. The prices here, especially for big bags of rolls? Are -awesome-.

Now, it’s important that you be aware that because these aren’t bags of high-preservative bread, they -will- get moldy after a period of time. If it’s fresh, depending on where you live, it could last up to something like a week and a half. Old bread could vary, but you usually have 3-4 days at -least-. A way to lengthen the time before the bread goes off is to remove it from whatever bag it’s in and just leave it sitting exposed to the air. It may dry out a little, and it’s apt to get a little stale at the end of its shelf life. There are things you can do with stale bread, but moldy bread is only useful as compost.

BUT WHAT IF I DON’T EAT ALL MY BREAD?

Well, there’s a solution to this! And that’s that you can freeze bread, dramatically extending its shelf life. This dramatically extends the shelf life of any bread you have. You can keep bread frozen for quite a long time. Sticking it in a freezer/ziplock bag works best. When you expect you’ll be eating a piece (rolls freeze best, usually, fyi) just pull it out of the freezer, dust off any ice that may have formed on it (you want to keep it dry as best as you can while it thaws so it doesn’t get icky) and just leave it to sit on a paper-towel to thaw. You could also potentially microwave or toast your bread (ala frozen waffles,) if you’re impatient. The texture may come out a bit off, but we’re not looking for gourmet bread here. We’re looking for cheap living.

Bread can also be kept in the fridge, but people will argue that you should never do that because it ruins the texture. Again. Not gourmet here. Cheap living. This said, refrigeration will only do so much to stave off buggies. Ultimately, it’s up to you. Because bread, especially discount bread is so cheap, feel free to experiment. Keep notes about how long the bread you buy lasts before it gets moldy.

And there you go! With prices as low as $0.14 a serving, bakery bread is a great way to supplement a meal so that it fills you up. The uses of bread are pretty obvious, but we’ll post some clever-er things you can do with it in the future!

Best of luck to you all.

For more money-saving tips, check us out at thesuburbanpoor.tumblr.com!

About “The Suburban Poor.”

Origin Story:

I created the Suburban Poor blog shortly after I graduated from College and found myself surviving with no prospects and a very small budget. One evening, several friends had been talking about money troubles, and I ended up offering up some of the tips and tricks I’d learned. Afterward, I realized that these musings might make for an interesting blog and useful blog. A few musings later over what to call the blog, “The Suburban Poor” was born!

About the Author:


I am a 23 year old living in the suburbs of Nebraska, one of the midwestern states in the United States. I am a college graduate* with a bachelor’s of arts who double-majored in the financially unhelpful fields of English and Philosophy. I was planning on going to law school, and had the grades and scores to do it. Statistics, however, suggested that this would be terrible financial decision, with law schools graduating 40 new lawyers each year for every 1 available legal position in the country. Unwilling to gamble on those odds with the massive student debt that law school would create, I decided against it. So here I am now, trying to make end’s meet and otherwise toodling about the internet.

Tags:

To help those looking for specific posts about certain core issues, the following tags will be used:

  • #Food — Posts tagged with this will cover ways to save money on food and cheap recipe ideas.
  • #Summer — Post tagged with this will cover ways to save money in the summer, either by using summer temperatures to your advantage, or by giving you cheap and easy ways to fight the summer heat.
  • #Winter — Post tagged with this will cover ways to save money in the winter, either by using winter temperatures to your advantage, or by giving you cheap and easy ways to stay warm.
  • #Time — Posts tagged with this will cover ways to save time on often time-consuming tasks. Time may not always be money, but you still usually end up paying for time that could have been spend recharing for important tasks.
  • #Collaboration — Posts Tagged with this will cover ways to save money that specifically involve collaborating and working together with friends, family, and your community.
  • #Misc — Posts Tagged with this will primarily cover ways to save money on things not listed above, as well as ways to keep yourself sane and happy when living on a tight budget.

Legal Stuff:


The banner at the top of the page is contains a creative-commons photo, “Back-to-Back-Alleyway” by Gene Hunt, taken in 2007 and posted on Flickr with the creative commons license to make commercial and noncommercial use of as-is and in modified form. The URL of that image is as follows: http://www.flickr.com/photos/raver_mikey/486663550/